The Tenth Day Of Christmas – With A Healthy Twist

On the tenth day of Christmas my true love gave to me…..ten wombats sleeping,  nine crocs a weeping, eight flies a feasting, seven possums playing, six sharks a swimming, five kan-ga-roos, four cuddling koalas, three little penguins, two pink galahs aaaaand a kookaburra up a gum tree.

Aaaahhh, sleep.  Can somebody find me some?  Eight hours sleep is ideal for us all but this can be a challenge during busy times like the tenth day of Christmas.  Too many things to get through, do not make a good recipe for a restful sleep.  I know I am not alone but I also know that sleep deprivation is used as a form of torture, so bring on the Christmas break I say.  Not many sleeps to go now.

Which brings me to our fast paced world and our now flexible mealtimes.  When I was growing up, my mum had dinner on the table religiously at 6pm and we all sat down and ate together (I am still trying to perfect that myself, unsuccessfully I might add).  

Eating early seems to be a thing of the past as we are working longer hours and may have children and other family commitments that prevent us from eating our evening meal at a civilised hour.  Some people find that it is uncomfortable to eat close to going to bed and this is turn will disturb sleep.  Others may not find this to be the case. 

There is also the question of what you are eating prior to sleeping. Snacking on chocolate (unless its your four nightly squares of course), biscuits and cake (many of which are high in fat) are not great choices before you lie down for eight  hours of sleep.  The evening is when your body is least active and therefore not burning a lot of fuel.

Essentially, you are the best judge of your own body but if you are experiencing disturbed sleep, acid reflux or other problems, then have a look at your eating habits before bed.

If you are still trudging the shops for Christmas presents on the tenth day of Christmas, don’t forget about my Christmas Giftpack – my book ‘truth, lies and chocolate’ combined with a delicious WineBar Espresso Martini chocolate – all beautifully wrapped and ready to go! Pick-up only now.

Click here for all details

The Fifth Day of Christmas – With a Healthy Twist

On the fifth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me….. Five kan-ga-roos, four cuddling koalas, three little penguins, two pink galahs aaaaand a kookaburra up a gum tree.

One of the first thoughts that comes to my mind on the fifth day of Christmas with kangaroo is lean red meat.  I know that might seem a bit mean to our international readers but in Australia we do multi-love kangaroo’s. By that I mean we admire their beauty and significance as part of our history but they are also a valuable food source.

Kangaroo (and some other game meat) is a very lean meat because they are very active animals. Their meat is a rich source of protein, iron and zinc.  Iron is important on any day but especially important during the Festive Marathon months of November, December and January.  You really do need plenty of energy whilst partying and socialising and iron assists by helping oxygen sail around your blood stream.  Everyone is after more oxygen aren’t they?

Is All Iron Equal?

Iron is known as haem (from an animal sources)  and non-haem (from a vegetable or plant source) iron. Haem iron is absorbed quite a bit more efficiently than the non-haem iron.  Liver is top dog in the iron stakes with red meat a much lower second, followed by chicken and fish with much lower amounts again.  

Breakfast cereal and legumes are decent sources of non-haem iron but need a friend in the form of  of Vitamin C to assist absorption. Fruit and vegetables are just the ticket for the Vitamin C assistance. For a more in-depth look at iron, take a look at the article I wrote for some of my athletes here. By the way, you don’t need to be an athlete to need iron.

Sad news about Popeye on the fifth day of Christmas. If you have ever seen a cartoon of Popeye chugging down a can of spinach with bulging muscles to get his fill, you may be thinking that spinach is the road to plenty of iron. Unfortunately the iron in spinach is very difficult to absorb due to other compounds in the leafy green (oxalates and phytates). These compounds bind the iron and make it unavailable to you. Sorry to burst that bubble.

And a bonus…..

For a delicious cupcake recipe that has a secret iron source inside check these out right now!

If you are still trudging the shops for Christmas presents on the fifth day of Christmas, don’t forget about my Christmas Giftpack – my book ‘truth, lies and chocolate’ combined with a delicious WineBar Espresso Martini chocolate – all beautifully wrapped and ready to go!  TODAY IS THE LAST DAY THAT YOU CAN BE SURE IT WILL ARRIVE IN TIME.

Click here for all details.